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Sep. 27th, 2004

lilymc borrowed two of my Narnia books in order to be properly equipped for camp this summer (this would be Camp Narnia: no, really). I just got them back last night and put them back into their boxy-thing this morning, and suddenly I'm wondering: am I the only person who arranges them in chronological rather than written order (ex: The Magician's Nephew, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, A Horse and His Boy, Prince Caspian, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, The Silver Chair, and the Last Battle, rather than the order the numbers dictate)? Or am I just a lone uber-geek?

I mean, it's not as if I *read* them often enough for it to really matter - C.S. Lewis's work gets more and more irritating to me the older I get - but I never throw books away, of course, and was curious.

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( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
icewing
Sep. 27th, 2004 12:19 pm (UTC)
I've actually seen a set of them numbered in that order. Mine have them in published order with the book number on the spine. But, as I said, I've seen a set that was prited with MN as #1 and so on and so forth.
lilymc
Sep. 27th, 2004 04:30 pm (UTC)
maddy lent me her giant book with all the books inside (she doesn't know I'm not giving it back :)) and it's in chrono order. I fianly read last battle, and you were right... it pissed me off and took away my passion for the series. no wonder the camp doesn't use that book as a theme:P
lavenderherring
Sep. 27th, 2004 04:53 pm (UTC)
Uhmm... back when I read those books I always wondered why the numbers on the spine never seemed to go with the way things happened. But then I became distracted and went off to play with my little ponies and my lone soon-to-be-decapitated barbie.

Er, if it makes you feel any better though, C.S. Lewis' own works became irritating to himself as he became older as well. See, he started off all optimistic and full of *faith* and spewed out theological books ("On being Christian" and stuff) and a heap of didactic children's literature (i.e. the Narnia series) and then his wife died of cancer and he decided there was no God.

...

That could either be seen as depressing or self-empowering, depending on point of view.
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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